Advanced Search Techniques

The Conflict Check search engine is very similar to the AdvoLogix global search search capabilities. Both search capabilities support the following advanced search topics.

1. Using Operators in Search Terms

AND

Finds records that match all the words with the search term. For example,  john AND smith finds items with both the word john and the word smith. Usually if an operator isn't specified, AND is the default operator.

OR

Finds records with at least one of the words in the search term. For example, john OR smith finds items with either john or smith, or both words.

AND NOT

Finds records that do not contain a word in search term. For example, john AND NOT smith finds items that have the word john but not the word smith.

( )

Use parentheses around words in the search term with logical operators to group words within the search term. For example, you can search for:

  • ("Bob" and "Jones") OR ("Sally" and "Smith")
    Searches for either Bob Jones or Sally Smith.

  • ("Bob") and ("Jones" OR "Thomas") and Sally Smith
    Searches for records that contain Bob Jones and Sally Smith or Bob Thomas and Sally Smith.

" "

Use quotation marks around search words to find matches in the order you entered your words. A search for "monday meeting" finds items that contain monday meeting in that exact phraseology.

NOTE: To include the words “and”, “or”, and “and not” in your search results, surround those words in double quotes. Otherwise they’re interpreted as the corresponding operators.

2. Using Wildcards in Search Terms

*

Asterisks match zero or more characters at the middle or end of your search word. For example, a search for john* finds records that start with john, such as, john, johnson, or johnny. A search for mi* meyers finds records with mike smith or michael smith.

If you are searching for a literal asterisk in a word or phrase, then escape the asterisk (precede it with the \ character).

?

Question marks match only one character in the middle or end of your search word. For example, a search for jo?n finds items with the term john or joan but not jon or johan